Setting Expectations

There have always been people who have taken things too seriously, but I’ve found online ‘fandom’ rather tiring recently. I’ve seen enough vitriol and ridiculousness to last a lifetime, and I know it’s not going to end. Adults using ‘this isn’t what I think it should be’ as an excuse to hurl misogynistic, homophobic, racist, and generally abusive comments at people is repulsive, and the pinnacle of people thinking that because they love something, they somehow own it. Not liking or agreeing with something is fine, but using it as an excuse to further your own agenda is idiotic and has no place anywhere. /rant.

I believe that some of this behaviour comes down to expectations. Personally I’ve been looking at how I manage my own, as it’s very easy to get caught up in the hype, especially when it’s an anticipated film in a franchise. Keeping a few key things in mind can allow you to go into the cinema in a much more peaceful state of mind, and hopefully enjoy the movie more :-

  1. Can a film produced now, possibly compare to something made when you were 8? Years of nostalgia and multiple views will trounce something you saw this week 99% of the time. Expecting something to match or exceed an original is setting yourself up for disappointment. Enjoy films for what they are and who you are now.
  2. You don’t know best. I’m sure you’ve given plenty of thought to ‘what’s next’ as soon as the lights came on at the end of the last film. We all do it. But I’ll wager the screenwriters have been thinking about it more. Whatever you’ve decided is the right way forward isn’t necessarily what the Writer and Director think. We aren’t all the same, and regardless of how cool your ideas are, there are probably good reasons they haven’t been realised.
  3. From The Godfather to Not Another Teen Movie, everything has its place, and that means not everything has to be a masterpiece. Films are made for different reasons! It can be mindless, or simple, or heavy, or countless other things. Being somewhat aware of the aim of the film will go a long way.
  4. Are you the only audience? Keep in mind that films, especially the big blockbusters, are made to appeal to very wide demographics. You are not the sole reason a film is made. It’s only fair to expect a film that appealed to kids and adults when you were a kid to have a sequel that does the same thing. That you’re now the adult and you’ve changed isn’t the film’s fault!

None of this should be ground-breaking, but it seems a lot of people could do with keeping it in mind.

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